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Author Topic: mould in my weed thats already dry !!!  (Read 186 times)

SilverSurfer

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mould in my weed thats already dry !!!
« on: September 09, 2004, 11:46:21 am »
hey there, so i stuffed up...
its been a month since i dryed my
weed, and i just noticed on my big buds have got
mold...
my question is can i still smoke it or will i get mouldy lungs

SilverSurfer

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mould in my weed thats already dry !!!
« Reply #1 on: September 09, 2004, 12:46:21 pm »
anyone     any1
 :confused:

Guitarzilla8

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mould in my weed thats already dry !!!
« Reply #2 on: September 09, 2004, 01:46:21 pm »
Hey,
I would think you could smoke it, because when you light it, it should breakdown from the flame. I don't think it would do anything abnormally to your lungs either.

SilverSurfer

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mould in my weed thats already dry !!!
« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2004, 02:46:21 pm »
thank you G

teetdogs

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mould in my weed thats already dry !!!
« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2004, 03:46:21 pm »
I'm no doctor but I know that alot of the "swag" that i have smoked in the past has had tons of mold on it I would think you would be fine.

smoken_kind

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mould in my weed thats already dry !!!
« Reply #5 on: September 09, 2004, 04:46:21 pm »
Last time I smoked some Mouldy stash I got this really nasty bad cough that lasted like 2 weeks. It was also Brick weed and I'm also allergic to alot of stuff. Just my $.02...

SilverSurfer

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mould in my weed thats already dry !!!
« Reply #6 on: September 09, 2004, 05:46:21 pm »
thank you thanks all
 :hello:

julianusapostat

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mould in my weed thats already dry !!!
« Reply #7 on: September 09, 2004, 06:46:21 pm »
With food, the reason why it can't be consumed once spoiled, even if cooked (sterilized) is because what makes the mold/contaminate dangerous in the first place is not the organism itself, but the toxins they release as byproducts. So really it all depends on the particular mold and whether the toxins produced by that one (if any) vaporize at the same temps as the rest of your weed.
That said, there's really only one way to find out... I say give it a go. Weed is a terrible thing to waste.

VinShady

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mould in my weed thats already dry !!!
« Reply #8 on: September 09, 2004, 07:46:21 pm »
I probabbally would make hash out of it . That mold getting  to your lungs dont sound good to me . I've also read in a thread somewhere that it could be dangerous to your lungs .

highonfire420

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mould in my weed thats already dry !!!
« Reply #9 on: September 09, 2004, 08:46:21 pm »
Well I would say that over the 20 years of smoking weed grown by unknown people all over the place, that the chances were great that I have smoked much mold.  Although saying that I would also say growing my own I am hoping I do not get a mold problem but if I do I will be doing exactly what VinShady suggested.  Make some wicked HASH.

way2faded

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mould in my weed thats already dry !!!
« Reply #10 on: September 09, 2004, 09:46:21 pm »
if you smoke that weed you will probably get sick cause I have smoked a **** load of moldy weed and gotten sick and started spinning and threw up.
its not chill but you may have a different reaction.

airedog

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mould in my weed thats already dry !!!
« Reply #11 on: September 09, 2004, 10:46:21 pm »
Go here (http://www.erowid.org/plants/cannabis/cannabis_writings3.shtml) for a good article on mouldy marijuana. Personally, I believe the hash option seems the best.
Airedog

highonfire420

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mould in my weed thats already dry !!!
« Reply #12 on: September 09, 2004, 11:46:21 pm »
Hey airedog,
That is a great article!

VicRatlhed

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mould in my weed thats already dry !!!
« Reply #13 on: September 10, 2004, 12:46:21 am »
Sorry guys I don't understand :P
So your saying that mould on pot isnt safe and can be deadly and 'dry' and 'brittle' pot is already infected, so does that mean its bad for me to smoke stuff thats dry and crumbly and gone a bit dark.
I read the article before and dried some out in a sealed jar and some whitish fluffly looking stuff appeared,(i know its mould) but is that safe to smoke? Can i just cut off the fluff and smoke it any way or is all of the bud infected and i shouldnt smoke it.
I read the article but it didnt say anything about being safe or dangerous to smoke these moulds. is there ways to get rid of mould on dry buds or near fresh buds?

highonfire420

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mould in my weed thats already dry !!!
« Reply #14 on: September 10, 2004, 01:46:21 am »
Mold – An Often Dangerous Fungus Among Us
Molds are simple, microscopic organisms present virtually everywhere, indoors and outdoors.  Molds, including all mushrooms and yeast, are fungi and are needed to break down dead material and recycle nutrients in the environment.  Molds to grow and reproduce need organic materials as a food source; including leaves, wood, paper and insulation.  Add heat and humidity above 50% and you have happy mold that proliferates rapidly.
Because molds grow by digesting organic material, what molds ingest is eventually destroyed.  Molds release innumerable lightweight spores, which in most instances eventually become airborne and travel to other destinations. These destinations then can become mold infested and sometimes toxic.
Negative Health Effects of Mold
Molds produce negative health effects through inflammation, allergy or infection.  Allergic reactions, including fever, are common after mold exposure.  Symptoms of those exposed to toxic molds which issue mycotoxins both individually or in combination are:
  Immune system suppression
  Respiratory problems including asthma and infections
  Eye irritation with burning, watery or reddened eyes
  Cough – dry and hacking
  Nose or throat irritation or both
  Skin rashes or irritation
  Memory impairment
  Irritable bowel syndrome
  Body aches and pain (Chronic Fatigue)
  Food Intolerances and allergies
  Headaches
  Mood swings
  Nasal and sinus congestion
 What Molds are Hazardous?
The most common indoor molds are Cladosporium, Penicillium, Aspergillus and Alternaria.  Stachybotrys (pronounced “stacky-bow-triss”) chartarum, known as “black mold,” is not uncommon and certainly not rare.  Stachybotrys may produce compounds that have toxic properties known as mycotoxins.  Mycotoxins are produced depending on what the mold is growing on, conditions such as temperature, pH and humidity.  Mycotoxins can appear in both living and dead mold spores.
While Stachybotrys is growing, a wet slime layer overlays the spores, preventing them from becoming airborne.  When the mold dies and dries, air currents or handling can cause spores to become airborne. Stachybotrys chartarum (also known as Stachybotrys atra) is a greenish-black mold that can grow on material with a high cellulose and low nitrogen content, such as fiberboard, gypsum board, paper, dust and lint.  Growth occurs when there is moisture from water damage, excessive humidity, water leaks, condensation, water infiltration, flooding or a combination of the above.  Constant moisture is required for growth.
How Do We Know If Toxic Mold Is Present?
If you can see or smell mold inside your home, office or school, take steps to eliminate the excess moisture and to safely clean up and remove the mold.  You may also suspect mold contamination if mold-allergic individuals express mold health problem symptoms, even if mold is not visible.  Be aware mold infestation may be hiding underneath or behind water-damaged surfaces or behind walls and ceilings.
Reliable air sampling for mold is expensive and requires specialized expertise and equipment not available to the general public. A call to your local health authorities will bring referrals to area mold specialist who can determine toxicity.  However, all molds should be treated the same with respect to potential health risks and removal.  Be safe, not sorry!
Who Is Most At Risk From Toxic Mold Exposure?
For some people, a small amount of mold spores can create health problems, particularly asthma and respiratory ailments, while others can tolerate an extremely high amount of spores prior to ill effects. Those most susceptible to mold health problems are individuals with existing respiratory conditions.  
Persons with weakened and suppressed immune systems, particularly those in treatments such as chemotherapy and the elderly, are at higher risk.  Infants and young children likewise are more susceptible to serious health problems from mycotoxin exposure.  Anyone with health problems believed due to mold infestation and exposure should seek professional medical assistance immediately.  
If you suspect you are ill due to exposure to mold in a building, you should probably vacate the home or building, at minimum until the cause and presence of mold is evaluated and removed, if necessary by professionals.